Updated on 09.25.20

Alabama

  • On July 29 the governor announced the extended the face-covering requirement as a part of her “safer at home” order until the end of August.
  • All restaurants and bars shall continue to operate as follows:
    • Such establishments may continue to offer food for take-out or delivery provided the social distancing protocols, including maintaining a consistent six-foot distance between people.
    • Such establishments are strongly encouraged to offer online ordering and curbside pickup of food.
    • Hospital food service areas are excluded from this order provided they have their own social distancing plan.
    • If establishments offer on-premises consumption of food or drink, they must limit the party size at tables to no more than eight people, and maintain at least six feet of separation between people seated at different tables, booths, chairs, or stools.
    • Employees shall wear a mask or other facial covering at all times while in regular interaction with patrons or guests.
    • No self-service by guests at drink stations, buffets, or salad bars.

Alaska

  • Businesses can return to 100% of their normal capacity, although local communities will have the option of keeping stricter rules.
  • The governor said they will monitor their Covid-19 numbers after the business reopening and will be prepared to tighten restrictions again, but he doesn’t believe that will be necessary. “I don’t foresee us going back to something that’s statewide,” Dunleavy said.
  • Reservations recommended but not required.

Arizona

  • From May 11, Arizona restaurants were able to offer dine-in services again. The governor said the state is working with the industry to come up with specific distancing rules for restaurants later in the week.
  • Reduced occupancy based on restaurant size; 10-person party limit

Arkansas

  • On June 15, Arkansas entered Phase 2 of its reopening plan. This order allows dine-in service to continue with an increase to up to 66% of the total seating capacity. This includes indoor and outdoor dining areas.  Seating shall be adjusted to maintain six feet between occupied seats at adjacent tables
  • On July 16, the governor mandated that masks be worn in all public places when physical distancing is not possible. This is to be in effect until July 20, 2020.

California

  • As of 07/13/20, Gov. Gavin Newsom issued another state-wide lockdown.
  • All indoor dining operations must close. Additionally, bars, brewpubs, breweries, and pubs must close both indoor and outdoor statewide, unless they are offering sit-down, outdoor dine-in meals. Alcohol can only be sold in the same transaction as a meal.
  • There is no indication yet for an end date to these limitations.

Colorado

  • The governor said May 25 that in-person dining will be allowed at 50% capacity or 50 people, whichever is less, starting May 27. Restaurants are also being encouraged to provide outdoor seating. Bars will remain closed.
  • Tables must be six feet apart; eight-person party limit.
  • The governor issued a statewide mask mandate on July 16, 2020. This requires people to wear a face-covering in public indoor spaces and on public and non-personal transportation services.

Connecticut

  • The state began reopening May 20.
  • Gov. Ned Lamont said the second phase will begin June 20. Indoor facilities including gyms, hotels, personal services, indoor restaurants (though no bars) will be allowed to re-open.
  • Restaurants may operate at 50 percent occupancy with outdoor dining only; tables must be six feet apart.

D. C.

  • Restaurants may operate at 50 percent occupancy; six-person party limit; tables outside must be six feet apart.

Delaware

  • Delaware entered Phase 2 of the economic reopening on June 15, 2020.
  • Restaurants and other food and drink establishments may operate at 60 percent occupancy.
    • Management must ensure all staff and customers wear a face covering, except for customers seated at a table to eat or drink, and arrange tables so that guests are 8 feet apart. Tables and high human touch surfaces must be disinfected every 15 minutes to two hours, depending on volume and between each party.
    • Must ensure that all guests have seats, be seated, and remain seated unless going to the restroom. Guests should not leave the table to retrieve food or drink.
    • Must ensure customers have a reservation in order to sit down in a facility.
    • Food establishments that do not provide table service must ensure counter service locations are spaced 6 feet apart. Signage and floor markings must be present to guide patrons in appropriately spacing while in line. Staff must be designated to ensure social distancing throughout the facility.
    • Must ensure that guests are provided with disposable menus and that there are no condiments on the table, with only single-use condiments provided.
    • In accordance with the Food Code, must ensure no bare hand contact by food workers with ready-to-eat foods and that to-go containers for food guests to bring home after dining are protected from possible contamination.
    • Must ensure that self-service food and buffet options do not reopen. Must ensure that bar service and seating at a bar do not reopen.
    • Employee health screening and return to work criteria.
    • Customers should be guided to seats by staff or clear signage to control traffic in, out, and through restaurants to ensure that safe social distancing is maintained as much as possible.
    • Must ensure that there are no common areas, pool tables, smoking areas, dance floors, etc. available for guests to congregate in.
  • On June 25, 2020 the Governor postponed Phase 3 of the state’s reopening.

Florida

  • Starting  May 18th, Florida’s Phase 1 reopening plan permitted restaurants to operate at full capacity outside with six-foot space between tables. Indoor seating is allowed at 50% capacity.
  • Bars were shut down statewide on June 26, 2020.
  • On July 8, Miami-Dade County closed dine-in service after a spike in COVID-19 cases. Restaurants will be allowed to serve customers only via delivery and takeout.
  • As of September 25, the governor declared that the state would be moving into its third phase, opening all bars and restaurants to 100% capacity. Although this mandates the minimum capacity for all restaurants must be 50%, local authorities must justify any capacity between this and full capacity.

Georgia

  • As of June 16, 2020 restaurants no longer have to restrict the number of people who can sit together, and limits of the number of patrons per square feet were lifted. Bars were allowed to welcome 50 people or 35 percent of the total listed capacity, whichever is greater.

Hawaii

  • As of May 5, 2020 the governor announced a plan to ease the stay-at-home restrictions in place, calling it a “safer-at-home” plan.
  • On June 5, restaurants and non-commercial gatherings of 10 or less (regardless of household) may resume operations with modifications.
  • Reopenings decided on a county-by-county basis, following social distancing measures.

Idaho

  • As of May 30, 2020, the state entered its third stage of reopening which will allow bars, breweries, and wineries to reopen at 50 percent capacity with additional guidelines. Although the state is now in its fourth phase of reopening, capacity limits for restaurants have not changed.
  • On July 9, the governor announced the state would remain in the fourth stage of reopening for at least an additional two weeks.

Illinois

  • On June 26, 2020, the state entered its fourth phase of reopening. In this, outdoor and indoor dining permitted, and tables must be six feet apart with 10 people or fewer per table.
  • Up to 50 people are allowed per room or floor. Venues without a Retail Food Establishment License will be limited to a maximum of two hours per party and alcohol sales at bars and restaurants must still end at 11 p.m. each night.
  • As of July 24, alcohol-serving establishments without a retail food license are no longer able to serve customers indoors.

Indiana

  • The state entered its fourth phase of reopening on June 12, 2020 with restaurants being able to operate at 75% capacity while maintaining social distancing best as possible. Bars were also permitted to open at 50% capacity.
  • The governor announced he would be postponing their fifth phase of reopening until at least September 25.
  • As of July 27, 2020 face covering were required in public.

Iowa

  • As of June 10, restaurants and bars have no strict capacity limits, but social distancing and strong hygienic measures must be in place. Tables must be six feet apart and patrons should be properly distanced.
  • The governor emphasized that the state limit on social gatherings of more than 10 people remains in place.

Kansas

  • Although the governor is not permitted to implement any new statewide orders until September 15, she is encouraging all counties to return back to Phase 2, which would close all bars and nightclubs and limit gatherings to 15 people.
  • The governor permitted restaurants to serve indoor and outdoor dining so long as patrons are properly distanced. Bars, however, are still not open for business.
  • All businesses are required to follow the state’s industry-specific guidelines regarding sanitation, and all customers must be at least six feet apart at all times.
  • There is a 10-person party limit, however, there are no strict capacity limits. Restaurants are only required to distance their customers.
  • On July 3, 2020, masks were required in all public spaces.

Kentucky

  • As of June 22, 2020, restaurants and other businesses were allowed to offer indoor dining  while operating at 33 percent capacity. After they have opened successfully for one month with social distancing guidelines, they are permitted to increase to 50 percent capacity.
  • There is currently no capacity limit for outdoor dining, although tables must be six feet apart for indoor and outdoor dining.
  • On July 9, the governor mandated wearing a mask in all public indoor areas and in outdoor areas where social distancing is impossible.

Louisiana

  • As of June 5, 2020, restaurants are permitted to operate at 50 percent capacity for indoor dining, while bars and breweries that do not have food permits reopened at 25 percent capacity; tables must be 10 feet apart.
  • Although there are currently no strict capacity limit on outdoor seating spaces, restaurants must follow social distancing measures.
  • On July 8, New Orleans mandated that bars and restaurants would not be allowed to offer bar seating beginning July 11.
  • As of July 11, the governor required that all citizens wear a mask in all public areas. On August 26th, the governor extended this mandate until September 11, continuing to operate in Phase 2.

Maine

  • As of May 18, 2020, the rural counties of Aroostook, Piscataquis, Washington, Hancock, Somerset, Franklin, Oxford, Kennebec, Waldo, Knox, Lincoln, and Sagadahoc were allowed to offer indoor dining with added health and safety precautions, including physically distancing customers, ensuring employees follow enhanced hygiene and sanitation practices, and controlling customer flow through reservations whenever possible.
  • Indoor dining and bar services in other counties has been postponed.

Maryland

  • As of June 19, restaurants were able to operate at 50 percent capacity.
  • Reopenings decided on a county-by-county basis, following social distancing measures. Local governments have the power to determine reopening plans.
  • On July 24, Baltimore suspended indoor dining at bars and restaurants. The city is also mandating that people wear masks outdoors and when social distancing of six feet is not possible.
  • As of July 31, the governor implemented a statewide ban on the sale of alcohol after 11 p.m. The statewide mask mandate was also expanded to now include anyone over the age of 5 as required to wear a mask in public. Not adhering to mask requirements is considered a violation and may affect licensing.
  • On September 4, the governor granted permission for a modified third phase of recovery, opening movie theaters and permitting concerts at limited capacity.

Massachusetts

  • As of June 22, 2020, the state entered part two of its third phase of reopening. The governor permitted indoor dining at 50 percent occupancy and outdoor dining so long as social distancing guidelines are adhered to.
  • Tables must be six feet apart; six-person party limit.
  • Although on July 6 the state entered its fourth phase of reopening, this has had no impact on restaurants. Boston entered the third phase on July 13, 2020.

Michigan

  • Currently, restaurants may operate at 50 percent occupancy; tables must be six feet apart.
  • On July 1, bars, previously allowed to reopen for indoor dining, reverted to takeout and outdoor drinking, after a spike in COVID-19 cases. Bars in northern Michigan and the Upper Peninsula were excluded from this order and may remain open.
  • On July 10, the governor signed an executive order that toughened the state’s existing mask-wearing requirements, most notably with a change that orders businesses to deny service or entry to those who refuse to cover their face.

Minnesota

  • As of June 10, 2020, the state entered the third phase of its reopening plan. Restaurants and bars may operate at 50 percent occupancy while adhering to social distancing and sanitation guidelines. Tables must be six feet apart.
  • As of July 25, the governor mandated that all citizens wear facial coverings in many public settings.

Mississippi

  • As of June 1, 2020, restaurants and bars may operate at 50 percent occupancy while taking reasonable steps to adhere to the industry-specific guidelines for sanitation and safety. Restaurants and bars must close at 10 pm and enforce a six-person party limit.
  • On July 1, the governor paused the reopening plans of fully opening the state on this date.
  • As of  July 10, the governor issued an executive order that tightens restrictions, including mask requirements, in 13 counties. In those counties, indoor gatherings are limited to 10 people and outdoor gatherings are limited to 20 people. The order lasts until July 20.
  • As of Aug. 4, face coverings were required statewide.

Missouri

  • As of June 16, 2020, the state fully reopened. Restaurants currently have no strict capacity limits, however, tables must be spaced out in accordance with social distancing guidelines.

Montana

  • As of June 1, 2020, the state entered its second phase of reopening.
  • This allows restaurants and bars to operate at 75% capacity.
  • On July 15, the governor issued a directive requiring face coverings to be worn in many indoor public spaces and outdoor gatherings.

Nebraska

  • As of August 1, 2020, many counties started entering the fourth phase of reopening. In the fourth phase, bars and restaurants can operate at full capacity while adhering to sanitation guidelines. Phase 4 also makes social distancing a recommendation rather than mandatory.
  • The rest of the state plans to remain in the third phase until at least Aug. 31.

Nevada

  • As of May 29, 2020, restaurants and bars shall operate under Phase 1 conditions: In-person or on-premises dining is limited to no more than 50% of available seating, self-service stations are prohibited, tables or available booths must be spaced at least 6 feet apart, and employees are required to wear a face covering.
  • All establishments licensed to serve food are highly encouraged to utilize outdoor seating to the maximum extent and continue curbside, delivery, and/or pickup operations.
  • On June 24, the governor mandated that all Nevada residents and visitors wear face coverings in public spaces.
  • On June 29, the governor extended the second reopening phase until the end of July.

New Hampshire

  • Reopenings decided on county-by-county basis, following social distancing measures
  • As of June 14, 2020, restaurants in six of the state’s 10 counties were allowed to reopen at full capacity, while the restaurants in the remaining counties can reopen at 50 percent capacity.
  •  Tables must be 6 feet apart, only six people can be seated at a table and servers must have cloth face coverings.

New Jersey

  • As of June 15, 2020, the state entered the second stage of its reopening plan. Restaurants were allowed to reopen for outdoor dining. Tables must be six feet apart.
  • Although originally indoor dining was going to reopen on July 2, the governor announced on June 29 the state would not be reopening indoor dining.
  • On July 8, the governor said he would sign an executive order that requires face coverings in outdoor public spaces when physical distancing is not possible.

New Mexico

  • As of July 13, 2020, the new public health order prohibits indoor dining at restaurants and breweries, which had been permitted at a limited capacity in the state since June 1.
  • Both restaurants and breweries may operate outdoor seating at 50 percent of the maximum occupancy as determined by fire code. Restaurants may continue to operate carry out, pickup and delivery services. Breweries may continue to operate curbside pickup services.

New York

  • On July 1, the governor said indoor dining at New York City restaurants will be delayed, while outdoor dining can continue. Tables must be six feet apart.
  • On July 16, the governor announced a set of measures tightening restrictions on the state’s bars and restaurants requiring that customers that want to buy an alcoholic beverage at any establishment must also buy food.
  • On September 30, New York will offer indoor dining at 25 percent capacity, adhering to social distancing and sanitation guidelines.

North Carolina

  • As of May 22, 2020, the state entered its second phase of reopening, which allows restaurants to operate at 50 percent occupancy as long as social distancing and sanitation guidelines are met. Bars still remain closed.
  • On June 24, the governor said North Carolina would pause reopening activity for three weeks and require residents to wear face coverings in public spaces.
  • As of July 31, the governor implemented a statewide ban on the sale of alcohol after 11 p.m.
  • On September 4, the state moved into Phase 2.5, which opens several indoor activity areas and limits gatherings to a maximum of 25 people indoors and 50 outdoors. Bars, nightclubs, movie theatres, and indoor entertainment centers remain closed.

North Dakota

  • Reopenings decided on county-by-county basis, following social distancing measures.
  • Many businesses were allowed to open on May 1. Qualifying businesses included bars and restaurants, but they must maintain social distancing of six feet, inform all employees and customers that they should avoid entering the facility if they have a cough or fever, provide contactless payment systems and hand sanitizer, and encourage wearing face masks.

Ohio

  • As of May 21, 2020, bars and restaurants are allowed indoor and outdoor dining. They must enforce a 10-person party limit, and tables must be six feet apart.
  • Catering businesses and banquet halls are set to reopen on June 1 under similar guidelines as restaurants by limiting crowds to 300 guests.
  • As of July 23, a statewide facial covering while in public mandate went into effect for anyone over the age of 10.

Oklahoma

  • As of June 1, 2020, the state entered its third phase of reopening, although restaurants and bars have been able to operate at full capacity since the second phase.

Oregon

  • As of  June 4, the governor announced that 26 counties have been approved to move forward to Phase 2, which increases the number of people permitted to gather together in addition to allowing bars and restaurants to stay open to midnight. Restaurants must limit the gathering capacity to a maximum of 250 people or the number of people, including staff, based on a determination of capacity (square footage/occupancy as specified below), whichever is less.
  • On July 13, the governor banned indoor gatherings of more than 10 people and required face coverings outside beginning July 15.

  • As of July 24, 2020, the capacity limit for restaurants, gyms and entertainment venues was reduced to 100 people indoors. Restaurants and bars have to close at 10 p.m. statewide.
  • As of September 1, the governor extended the State of Emergency for 60 days. Restaurants and bars will continue to close at 10 p.m. and only permit 100 people indoors.

Pennsylvania

  • As of June 19, 2020, 54 counties moved from the yellow to the green reopening phase 13 counties still remain in the yellow phase. In the green phase, restaurants and bars can reopen at 50 percent capacity. All businesses must follow CDC and DOH guidance for social distancing and cleaning.
  • On July 1, masks were required for anyone who leaves their home.
  • On July 2, Allegheny County, which includes Pittsburgh, ordered bars, restaurants and casinos to close for in-person services. Gatherings and events of more than 25 people were not allowed.
  • On September 21, restaurants will be permitted to increase indoor dining capacity to 50 percent while still adhering to sanitation and social distancing guidelines.

Puerto Rico

  • As of June 15, 2020, the territory lifted nearly all of its coronavirus restrictions, allowing businesses to operate seven days a week and restaurants can be filled to 50 percent capacity.

Rhode Island

  • On June 30, the state moved into Phase 3 of reopening, allowing bars to reopen for seated service only and indoor and outdoor recreational and entertainment establishments, such as movie theaters, to resume. Restaurants may continue to operate at 50 percent occupancy.
  • Outdoor dining is still encouraged as long as the restaurant does not serve more than its normal operating capacity and physical distancing can be maintained. Additionally, if an establishment has established extra outdoor dining capacity in Phase I or Phase II, that additional outdoor capacity may remain in Phase III if in accordance with the municipality’s approval processes.
  • Self-service seating (e.g. in a fast food restaurant) is prohibited.
  • Mingling or congregating of customers is prohibited. Establishments should take measures to prevent mingling and congregating of customers—especially at bars and in waiting areas, including outdoor bars and waiting areas.
  • Tables must be eight feet apart and six feet away from highly trafficked areas.

South Carolina

  • As of May 11, 2020, restaurants may operate at 50 percent occupancy.
  • On July 10, the governor issued an order prohibiting restaurants and bars from selling alcohol after 11 p.m.
  • As of Aug. 3, the governor mandated operating capacity for restaurants to restrict dine-in services at restaurants to 50 percent.

South Dakota

  • Social distancing measures recommended but not enforced.

Tennessee

  • On July 3, restaurants in Nashville reverted to 50 percent capacity, after a spike in COVID-19 cases.
  • Tables must be six feet apart; 10-person party limit.
  • As of July 27, the governor confirmed that he currently has no plans to close down bars or reduce indoor dining capacity.

Texas

  • As of 6/29/2020, restaurants revert to 50 percent capacity, after spike in COVID-19 cases; capacity limits don’t apply to outdoor seating.
  • In addition, bars previously open at 50 percent capacity must close.
  • As of Sept. 21, the governor increased restaurant operating capacity to 75%.

Utah

  • The state allowed restaurants to let customers dine in again “with extreme precaution” starting May 1.
  • Although in-person dining will be allowed as long as social distancing is maintained and the health of employees is monitored, the state still says takeout and delivery are preferable. Restaurants must operate at 50 percent capacity so long as masks are worn and hand sanitizer is used before each trip to a self-service line; tables must be six feet apart; 10-person party limit.
  • Restaurants must also sanitize the utensils every 30 minutes and individually hand out the needed tools for the line.
  • As of Aug. 6, the state allowed for local authorities to determine whether they want to mandate masks.

Vermont

  • Restaurants are restricted to 25 percent capacity; tables must be six feet apart.
  • As of Aug. 1, facial coverings were mandated statewide in all public spaces.

Virginia

  • Restaurants may operate at 50 percent capacity.
  • All parties must be separated by at least six feet, including in the bar area.
  • Customers may be provided with self-service options. Facilities must provide hand sanitizer at food lines and require the use of barriers (e.g., gloves or deli paper) when employees or patrons touch common utensils. Food lines must be monitored by trained staff at all times of operation, and serving utensils must be changed hourly.
  • Employees working in customer-facing areas must wear face coverings over their nose and mouth at all times.
  • Bar seats and congregating areas of restaurants must be closed to patrons except for through traffic. Non-bar seating in the bar area (i.e., tables or counter seats that do not line up to a bar or food service area) may be used for customer seating as long as a minimum of six feet is provided between parties at tables.

Washington

  • Restaurants may operate at 50 percent occupancy; five-person party limit.
  • The governor has modified social gathering party limits, but has not modified the current restaurant operating capacity.

West Virginia

  • Restaurants may operate at 50 percent occupancy; tables must be six feet apart; six-person party limit.

Wisconsin

  • No statewide restrictions; limits and reopenings decided on county-by-county basis. Milwaukee and Dane county are allowed to operate at 25% occupancy.
  • The governor issued a statewide mask mandate that goes into effect Aug. 1 and lasts until at least Sept. 28.

Wyoming

  • Bars and restaurants were allowed to reopen on Friday, May 15.
  • Tables must be six feet apart; six-person party limit. Up to 250 people, so long as social distancing guidelines are met, are allowed in a single, confined space.
  • Unlike most states with similar regulations, people from different households will be allowed to sit at the same table. Buffet service is not allowed, and all restaurant employees must be screened for Covid-19 symptoms before beginning work.
  • As of August 15, the governor has extended the public health orders for restaurants, bars, and other public areas until September 15.